PAST EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS

Newest exhibitions and events are at the top of the page. Where available, click the image strip to see more images.


 

Material Witness: The Object of Photography

Opening Reception: Friday, March 31, 5-8pm

Closing Reception + Artist Talk: Friday, April 28, 5-8pm

Pushed from one side by social media and phone imagery and on the other side by artists who reject straight photography outright, the currents of photography today are more muddied—and more amazing—than ever before. Breaking from the tradition of photography as a passive truth machine, the lens and the film uncompromised, these artists instead let the idea and the image cultivate over time in the studio and beyond.

Collar Works Gallery is pleased to present Material Witness: The object of photography, an exhibition of artists who exemplify the shifting ground under what we now call photography.   Exhibiting Artists: Sarah Comfort, Scott Nelson Foster, Matt Frieburghaus, Danny Goodwin, Robert Hite, Nichola Kinch, Ellie Krakow, Anna Yeroshenko, New York State Mesonet. Co-curated by Justin Baker, Bill Jaeger and Rob O'Neil.


Performance: The Machine that Wouldn't Die

Troy Night Out - Friday, February 24, 8:30pm

The exhibition Informal Language will be on view this Troy Night Out from 5-8pm, followed by a special performance by the Machine that Wouldn’t Die.  MTWD is part performance art, part punk rock band: Beat Happening meets Devo, all under the direction of Jim Henson’s ghost. The Machine that Wouldn’t Die, an immortal mechanical mind, will tell its story through a series of coded communications that includes static, pops, and the occasional punk rock anthem-- aided by a group of bass, guitar, and drum-wielding synthoids (who will in turn be aided by their human pets, Ryan Jenkins, Andrew Lynn, Silvia Ruzanka, and Nathan Meltz).  Free and Open to the Public.

The exhibition Informal Language will be on view this Troy Night Out from 5-8pm, followed by a special performance by the Machine that Wouldn’t Die.  MTWD is part performance art, part punk rock band: Beat Happening meets Devo, all under the direction of Jim Henson’s ghost. The Machine that Wouldn’t Die, an immortal mechanical mind, will tell its story through a series of coded communications that includes static, pops, and the occasional punk rock anthem-- aided by a group of bass, guitar, and drum-wielding synthoids (who will in turn be aided by their human pets, Ryan Jenkins, Andrew Lynn, Silvia Ruzanka, and Nathan Meltz).  Free and Open to the Public.


Informal Language

January 27 - March 18, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday, January 27, 5-8pm

Informal Walk-Around: conversation with curator Jenny Kemp and artists: Saturday, February 25, 3pm

Collar Works is pleased to announce, Informal Language, a show of painting, sculpture, and installation curated by Jenny Kemp with works by Nadine Beauharnois, Danny Ginsburg, Kelsey Renko, and Christine Snyder. Motivated by continuing interests in abstraction, Informal Language brings together four young artists that work in playful and inventive styles, creating within their chosen forms a language of their own, but also one that speaks collectively to a mood concerned with the present.

Created through a seeming filter in which emotional and aesthetic information twists, bends, and permeates, these works present themselves in lively patterning, vivid color combinations, seductive surfaces, and humorous shapes. They possess a fresh and tactile immediacy that draws us into their colloquialisms and ultimately entice us.

Nadine Beauharnois makes sculptures that examine the nature of human experience as a combination of the awkward, painful, and humorous. These are humble objects that occasionally sag and bend and some may appear to be injured or have parts missing. Often, a sculpture begins in response to the memory associated with a visual experience- like intently concentrating on someone’s richly patterned sweater during an uncomfortable conversation. Some members of this cast of characters appear to be in a state of motion or change: running, lurching, or collapsing, and often possess attributes like eyes, hair, and nondescript appendages. Gestures tentatively reach and awkwardly balance, recalling the unsettled humor and ever-shifting discomforts of existing in a human body. 

Danny Ginsburg uses the sensuous qualities of color and material to explore how semiotic meaning is made. Differences in form and space generate odd, unplanned meaning in layers of action and reaction, until each part satisfies the next and its whole. He draws inspiration from mundane experiences, spiritual ideologies and critical theory to create objects using techniques learned through a formal art training and his occupation as a heavy construction laborer. 

Kelsey Renko creates paintings as a way to process through visual ideas by manipulating color, shapes and layers. For her, events are portrayed subconsciously and memories of form or color appear as a reference to manipulate.

Christine Snyder draws on an ever-growing collection of visual references, creating playful drawings and sculptures. Though primarily rocks, minerals, and mushrooms, references may be anything from a piece of cake to a radiator. The forms created become far enough removed from the original referent that they take on their own identity. While they often appear as man-made, inanimate objects, they may also resemble a creature or a plant-like growth. Though each piece may be oddly familiar, they remain in a state of ambiguity.



2016 Screenprint Biennial
October 28 - December 23, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, October 28, 5-9pm Troy Night Out

You see it everywhere, but might not recognize it as its own unique art form. Screenprinting: an image-making technique most known for its industrial applications like sign or textile printing.  

In celebration of this multi-faceted art form, Troy, NY will be the launching site for the 2nd Screenprint Biennial from October 28-December 23, 2016. Drawing upon the works of 35 artists from around the world, the event includes two large-scale exhibitions at Collar Works Gallery and the Arts Center of the Capital Region, as well as a temporary site-specific work created by Providence, Rhode Island based artist Ian Cozzens at Oakwood Community Center.  

The Screenprint Biennial is the brainchild of, and coordinated by, Nathan Meltz, Lecturer in the Department of the Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Meltz has collaborated with The Arts Center of the Capital Region, Collar Works Gallery, Oakwood Community Center, and volunteers from the community to make this dream a reality. Financial support has come from both corporate sponsors in addition to a grant from the International Fine Art Print Dealers Association to publish an exhibition catalog.

Screenprint Symposium: Saturday, October 29th. 

A one-day symposium featuring a panel of nationally recognized artists discussing trends in screenprinting will be held on Saturday, October 29th from 11am-2pm, and is free and open to the public.

11AM-Noon: The Arts Center of the Capital Region will feature a roundtable discussion with exhibiting artists.

1-2PM: Collar Works Gallery will feature a talk by exhibiting artist Josh MacPhee, co-founder of the Interference Archive in Brooklyn, NY, and expert in the field of political graphics.

The Screenprint Biennial appreciates its local and national business sponsors: Speedball, Rareform Brewery, SpaceoutVR, and the Lucas Confectionary. In addition, it appreciates its support from the International Fine Art Print Dealers Association.


Breathing Lights Public Art Dialogue: Part 2

National Experts: The Opportunity Creators will be held at Collar Works Gallery in Troy, NY

Friday, October 14th at 6:30pm

Moderated by: Judie Gilmore, Public Arts Consultant and Breathing Lights Project Manager

Join us as we welcome some of the nation's leading experts in public art -- Barbara Schaffer Bacon, Co-Director of the Americans for the Arts' Animating Democracy program; Caitlin Butler, Director of Development for Mural Arts Philadelphia; and Jesse Hamerman, Director of Exhibitions for the Public Art Fund in NYC --for a lively discussion about their experiences administering public art, community-based and social practice art projects. 
 

Presented in partnership with Breathing Lights, Collar Works Gallery, Spring Street Gallery, Breathing Lights and the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College.


Reclamation

September 30-October 22, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, September 30, 5-8PM at Troy Night Out. Troy Trolley Available.

Breathing Lights Exhibition Tours: Saturday, October 1, 2-7pm.  Troy Trolley Available between The Arts Center, Collar Works and The Sanctuary for Independent Media.

Reclamation, refers to the act of returning something to a former state. Synonymous with improvement, recovery, recycling, repossession, and redemption. This idea is only offered as a starting place.  Exhibiting artists from across the northeast include: Fern Apfel, Samuel Branden, Kim Faler, Daesha Devon Harris, Dina Kantor, Naomi Lewis, Nathan Meltz, Susan Meyer,  Stephen Niccolls, Jesse Potts, Claire Sherwood, Barbara Todd, Grace Sachi Troxell, and Nicholas Warndorf.

Guest Curated by Ian Berry, Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College.

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

Artists see through everyday and discarded things accessing dormant stories within. The inventive artists in Reclamation are joined by a keen ability to refocus our world and make us aware of new possibilities. Like the creators of Breathing Lights, these diverse artists shine a light on what is usually passed by. 

In some cases the subject is material - the stuff we know very well but rarely mine for poetic or narrative potential - sewn shirts in paintings by Samuel Brandon, re-arranged book type in Fern Apfel’s collages, or the over-ripe detritus in playful and gutsy sculptures by Kim Faler and Grace Sachi Troxell. 

Other times it is an attention to people around us - either in the historical record or neighbors around the corner, like those found within illuminating collages by Daesha Devon Harris and clear-eyed photographs by Dina Kantor.  

Responding and reacting to found influences, several of these artists re-mix existing artwork and design. This is on display in abundant prints by Nathan Meltz including a new work made directly on the gallery wall, and the seemingly everyday wallpaper of Naomi Lewis. Adaptive re-use is also at play in an overflowing mixed media laboratory by Susan Meyer and the performative conscious-raising weaving of Barbara Todd.  

 Stephen Niccolls and Claire Sherwood offer more abstracted views of our surroundings with carefully handled muted colors and suggestive forms. Through texturally precise paintings and sewn sculptures, their works quietly hold their ground in plain site, and offer more private moments of re-discovery. 

Time itself is reclaimed and made visible in an ominous filmstrip drawing by Nicholas Warndorf and a glorious contraption by Jesse Potts. Their works are catalysts for making elusive and potentially overwhelming ideas of geological time and memory present and real. 

Ian Berry

Dayton Director, The Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College


Image: Victoria Palermo

Image: Victoria Palermo

Public Art Dialogue: Part 1

Friday, September 16th, 6:30pm at Spring Street Gallery, Saratoga Springs.

The 'Artists' Perspective' with Adam Frelin of Breathing Lights, Victoria Palermo, Fernando Orellana and Jacqueline Weaver.

Moderated by: Ian Berry, Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College

Join us for a lively conversation with artists Adam Frelin, Fernando Orellana, Victoria Palermo & Jacqueline Weaver, as they share their experiences creating public artworks.


 

THE PARTIAL OBSERVER
Drawings and Paintings by Darcie Abbatiello and Richard Moninski
August 26 - September 18

Opening Reception: Friday, August 26 from 5-8 pm

Curator’s Statement

The works in this exhibition reveal a unique sense of truth in relation to place and time. 

Though seemingly quite different at first pass, both artists overlay a sublime mixture of emotional content and juxtaposed iconography onto layers of discovered information in a way that allows the resulting imagery to be equally and satisfyingly tangential to their inspirational sources. 

Sources that are masquerading as, or asserting to be, or might be, factual. 

There is a finely weighed mixture of historical fiction, documentary, and the front page of yesterday’s newspaper in both Moninski’s and Abbatiello’s work.

We, and the artists, take a Flaneur-like psycho-geographical walk through these historical environments, finding those spaces and connections of personal interest that reveal everything of momentary importance. 

What they give us so generously and beautifully is the privilege to constantly revisit those places of reflection and poignancy, yet never remember or rediscover them in the same manner or from the same direction.

“Making art is a way of arriving at knowledge that is not subject to cross-examination.”  William Kentridge

Kenneth Ragsdale, Curator

 

Artist Statements

Richard Moninski
It is a product of my reflections on the natural and cultural history of New England, the region where I was born and raised. I have particular interest in the seventeenth century, the time of European colonization, where the clash of Native and English cultures was extremely complex. In my paintings I juxtapose various indigenous flora and fauna, portraits of seventeenth century New Englanders and stylized representations of plants taken from European decorative arts traditions.  Being influenced by textiles, I have often appropriated ideas of textile and surface design in furthering my conceptual goals, like the conflation of fine and applied art and the imbuing of decorative imagery with symbolic content. I paint directly on commercially printed fabrics with acrylic, incorporating and modifying the existing printed designs, which are usually camouflage patterns. - RM

Darcie Abbatiello 
Throughout these different series of drawings, Passed On, Missing Persons, Civil War Soldiers, and Magicians; I am dealing with an element of the unknown, the lost, the forgotten, and memory.  I am interested in these persons, primarily female subjects; who have graced the earth, have had encounters, have had stories- and then become lost in history with the passing of time.  Through the drawing process I feel as if I'm beginning to unearth their presence; to recreate them or give them a rebirth in a new place and time. -DA


The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies

Friday, August 26, 3-8pm

COST: FREE

Part wigwam, part children's blanket fort, The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies is a traveling performance installation by artist James Leonard. The exterior is constructed of raw marine canvas and sepia tone paintings of plant and animal species affected by climate change. Inside the tent, a hand quilted rainbow of recycled fabric creates an environment where individuals can participate in climate-change divination readings using Tarot. Each reading begins with a question from the participant about their own climate concerns and lasts 10-15 minutes.

The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies, currently on a Northest tour, has appeared at a national park beach in Boston Harbor, inside a cloistered wildlife refuge in Jersey City, at the Queens Museum in NYC, and most recently at MASS MoCA during an artist residency.

Leonard who most recent explains, “A lot of thought has gone into The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies. I wanted to create a space for contemplation, where participants can slow down, articulate questions, and find clarity. Climate change is a universal concern. Art is the perfect place for expressing and evaluating concern.”

http://jamesleonard.org/


Art and yoga come together in celebration of the mind and body to support two Troy organizations: Troy Yoga and Collar Works. Presented by Yogatrōpic.

When: Saturday, July 16th, 10-11:15am

Where: Collar Works, 621 River St, Troy, NY

Suggested Donation: $20

Begin your Saturday morning with an invigorating yoga class led by Raeanne Wright, founder of Yogatrōpic and Director of Troy Yoga. Flow through an all-levels vinyasa class surrounded and inspired by captivating art works at Collar Works in its new 4,000 square foot contemporary gallery space near downtown Troy. 

New to yoga? No worries - props, blankets, and mats are available if necessary (first come, first served basis), and posture modifications are provided.

New to art? No problem - Collar Works members will be available to answer any questions you may have about the SciArt exhibition on view.

Make a morning out of it! The gallery will be open after class for participants to explore the art work in a private setting. Afterwards, venture just a few blocks down to the Troy Farmers Market for an array of ways to Enjoy Troy!

100% of your donation will be split equally by the organizations. 

About Collar Works

Collar Works is a non-commission art space located in Troy, New York dedicated to the support of emerging and under-represented artists, working in any media, exhibiting challenging and culturally relevant contemporary artworks. Striving to expand the current art vernacular in New York’s capital region, Collar Works provides a venue for community dialogue focused on serious, provocative and spirited artworks.

About Troy Yoga

Troy Yoga is a concept: make yoga accessible to everyone. Yoga is good for everyone, and Troy Yoga is about making yoga available so the goodness can seep out into the community and more people can experience its benefits. Please visit our website to learn more about its donation-based class schedule. www.troy-yoga.com

About Yogatrōpic

Yogatrōpic is a local online publication devoted to exploring yoga, health, well-being, mindfulness, sustainable living, social justice, and a whole bunch of other stuff. Based in New York’s Hudson Valley and Capital District, our vision is to foster a community of mindful folk to share ideas, make each other think and laugh, inspire and be inspired, and make the most out of life in the valley and beyond. We do this by featuring the work of local writers, sharing our thoughts on living the mindful life, and spotlighting local people, businesses, and initiatives. www.yogatropic.com


Distinguishable from Magic

June 24 - July 23, 2016

curated by SciArt Center in collaboration with Collar Works.

Exhibiting SciArt members include: Amber Eve Anderson, Linda Behar, Jared Vaughan Davis, Greg Dunn, Cedric van Eenoo, Anna Fine Foer, Richelle Gribble, Constance Halporn, Alinta Krauth, Robert Krawczyk, and Leila Christin Nadir.

Curatorial Statement


“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” – Arthur C. Clarke

One of the greatest impacts that technology has had is the ability to connect and communicate instantaneously across the globe. What once may have seemed out of reach, like the ability to talk ‘face to face’ with someone living 10,000 miles from your home, is now just one click away. 

You are sitting cross-legged on a dusty, dirt-covered rug, facing a 12-year-old girl. Her name is Sidra. You are in a Syrian refugee camp listening to her tell you about her life: “I am in the fifth grade. I am from Syria, in the Daraa Province, Inkhil City. I have lived here in the Zaatari camp in Jordan for the last year and a half. I have a big family.”


The scene described above comes from the documentary “Clouds Over Sidra.” Departing from a typical documentary experience, the creators made “Clouds Over Sidra” to be viewed through an Oculus Rift, a virtual reality headset. Speaking on the viewer’s experience, co-creator Chris Milk says, “...when you're sitting there in her room, watching her, you're not watching it through a television screen, you're not watching it through a window, you're sitting there with her.” 


The genre of science fiction has long addressed the question of what it is to be human in the face of advancing technology, but many aspects of this question are no longer limited to science fiction as they quickly become science and technology fact. Technology is changing human relationships with others and to one’s self, on both an emotional and functional level. Beginning with the Internet and jumping to artificial intelligence, prosthetic limbs, robotics, cybernetics, virtual reality, biotechnology, and more, humanity is left to question what constitutes our identity. Is our humanity altered when an artificial heart pumps our blood, or a robotic arm takes the place of one lost? What would it mean about us if a machine felt our same emotions, as seen in movies like “Her” and “Ex Machina”? We are left to question our species’ social and biological evolution with the dominance of social interactions taking place through online platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat. 


Marnie Benney, SciArt Curator

 

SciArt Center's shows begin in the virtual. View the virtual show here.


 

We are excited to launch Collard Greens, our new dinner + dialogue series around topics in the arts.  Our first event will take place Friday, July 8th around the topic of ART + SCIENCE, in conjunction with the SciArt exhibition Distinguishable From Magic on display in the gallery through July 23.

The evening will kick-off with beer, wine and a signature cocktail on our rooftop patio at Hudson Arthaus, overlooking a beautiful view of Troy, followed by a curated three-course dinner + dialogue event in Collar Works' Gallery led by Michael Oatman, Artist and Associate Professor at RPI, and our guest panelists: Annmarie Lanesey, Greanetree; Silvia Ruzanka, Associate Professor at RPI; Anna Fine Foer, SciArt Artist; Constance Halporn, SciArt Artist. 

$25 per person • Space is Limited • Please RSVP by July 1

Email info@collarworks.org or call 518.285.0765

Beverages provided by Rare Form Brewing Company and The Albany Distilling Company. Dinner provided by McGreivey's Restaurant, Nature Lab and The Rose & Kettle.

The land we did not know

Kyra Garrigue, David Prusko and Jason Kates Van Stavern.

May 27 - June 18

Collar Works Gallery is pleased to present The land we did not know, Featuring the work of Kyra Garrigue, David Prusko and Jason Kates van Staveren. The work presented offers permutations on the self, identity and history in a range of complex forms, such as video, performance and installation. 

Join Collar Works, for an opening reception on Friday, May 27, from 5-8pm.  The exhibition will be on display through June 18.

Image Right: Laini Nemett.  Image Left: Chris Duncan.

Image Right: Laini Nemett.  Image Left: Chris Duncan.

Assembled - Chris Duncan & Laini Nemett

April 29 - May 21, 2016

 

Assemble v. - [uh-sem-buh l]

1 : to bring together (as in a particular place or for a particular purpose) 2 : to fit together the parts of

Examples of Assembled in a sentence:

a. Chris Duncan assembles color, line and movement to create explosions of form that reflect our tendency towards destruction and rebirth.

b. Similarly, Laini Nemett assembles literal and figurative imagery of construction, inspired by abandoned environments and reconstructing dreams.

c. Starting April 29th, 2016, both artists are assembled in an exhibition at Collar Works in Troy, NY.

d. This exhibition was assembled by Fernando Orellana.

 

Ladies, Babies + Hadies

As we say farewell to the persistent plight of winter and celebrate the arrival of spring, Collar Works presents Ladies, Babies + Hades, an exhibit which harnesses the power and force of femininity, featuring the works of Beverly Acha, Monica Bill Hughes, Luna Furtwangler, Sierra Furtwangler, Sophia Narrett and G.G. Roberts.  This exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2016.

As Jane Fonda stated, “A man has every season while a woman only has the right to spring.”  Be it the surge of an innate Mother Earth sweeping death and dust out the door, or just the remnants of a lingering stereotype pinning women to childbirth, tweeting chickadees, and flower beds; Spring is here and Spring is ours. Whatever their narrative may be; Ladies, Babies and Hades will showcase six amazing, bad ass, beautiful, angry, pleasant, talented, sexy, sexist, miserable, cocky, cool, modest, macho, independent, ugly, prude, frustrated, happy, incredible women making great art.

Georgia Wohnsen, Curator

We would like to thank our sponsors Rare Form Brewing Company and No Name Design.

 

Procrustes: Victoria Palermo and Adam Daily

February 26 -March 19, 2016

Left: Victoria Palermo, "Blue and red" (detail), 2016, mixed media, dimensions variable. Right: Adam Daily, "M4", 2013, 48”×48” acrylic on Sintra In Greek Mythology, the son of Poseidon, Procrustes, invited travelers to spend the night in his mountain stronghold, where he set to work on them with his smith’s hammer to stretch them to fit his iron bed. This legend has become the name sake and metaphor for mathematical applications in which geometric equations are used to make shapes fit a given proportion. In the exhibition, Procrustes, Victoria Palermo and Adam Daily engage the viewer in the same way. Victoria’s new body of work “Horizon Line” seeks to engage the immense new space of the Collar Works gallery using geometry and light. The works play with notions of architecture and landscape while acknowledging the industrial character of the exhibit space. The paintings of Adam Daily are finely crafted two-dimensional surfaces with the sculptural power to push and pull their environment. Adams paintings are built from hundreds of individual isometric shapes assembled and guided by a set of self-imposed visual rules. Together the work of Victoria Palermo and Adam Daily will push the new Collar Works gallery in mood and chromatic intensity.

Left: Victoria Palermo, "Blue and red" (detail), 2016, mixed media, dimensions variable. Right: Adam Daily, "M4", 2013, 48”×48” acrylic on Sintra

In Greek Mythology, the son of Poseidon, Procrustes, invited travelers to spend the night in his mountain stronghold, where he set to work on them with his smith’s hammer to stretch them to fit his iron bed. This legend has become the name sake and metaphor for mathematical applications in which geometric equations are used to make shapes fit a given proportion. In the exhibition, Procrustes, Victoria Palermo and Adam Daily engage the viewer in the same way. Victoria’s new body of work “Horizon Line” seeks to engage the immense new space of the Collar Works gallery using geometry and light. The works play with notions of architecture and landscape while acknowledging the industrial character of the exhibit space. The paintings of Adam Daily are finely crafted two-dimensional surfaces with the sculptural power to push and pull their environment. Adams paintings are built from hundreds of individual isometric shapes assembled and guided by a set of self-imposed visual rules. Together the work of Victoria Palermo and Adam Daily will push the new Collar Works gallery in mood and chromatic intensity.

As we say farewell to the persistent plight of winter and celebrate the arrival of spring, Collar Works presents Ladies, Babies + Hades, an exhibit which harnesses the power and force of femininity, featuring the works of Beverly Acha, Monica Bill Hughes, Luna Furtwangler, Sierra Furtwangler, Sophia Narrett and G.G. Roberts.  This exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2016. As Jane Fonda stated, “A man has every season while a woman only has the right to spring.”  Be it the surge of an innate Mother Earth sweeping death and dust out the door, or just the remnants of a lingering stereotype pinning women to childbirth, tweeting chickadees, and flower beds; Spring is here and Spring is ours. Whatever their narrative may be; Ladies, Babies and Hades will showcase six amazing, bad ass, beautiful, angry, pleasant, talented, sexy, sexist, miserable, cocky, cool, modest, macho, independent, ugly, prude, frustrated, happy, incredible women making great art. Georgia Wohnsen, Curator   Opening Reception: Friday, March 25, 5-8pm Join Collar Works on Troy Night Out, Friday, March 25 from 5-8pm for an opening reception of Ladies, Babies + Hades. We would like to thank our sponsors Rare Form Brewing Company and No Name Design. Howdy Doody, December - January 2015-16. Curated by Leona Christie

As we say farewell to the persistent plight of winter and celebrate the arrival of spring, Collar Works presents Ladies, Babies + Hades, an exhibit which harnesses the power and force of femininity, featuring the works of Beverly Acha, Monica Bill Hughes, Luna Furtwangler, Sierra Furtwangler, Sophia Narrett and G.G. Roberts.  This exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2016.

As Jane Fonda stated, “A man has every season while a woman only has the right to spring.”  Be it the surge of an innate Mother Earth sweeping death and dust out the door, or just the remnants of a lingering stereotype pinning women to childbirth, tweeting chickadees, and flower beds; Spring is here and Spring is ours. Whatever their narrative may be; Ladies, Babies and Hades will showcase six amazing, bad ass, beautiful, angry, pleasant, talented, sexy, sexist, miserable, cocky, cool, modest, macho, independent, ugly, prude, frustrated, happy, incredible women making great art.

Georgia Wohnsen, Curator

 

Opening Reception: Friday, March 25, 5-8pm

Join Collar Works on Troy Night Out, Friday, March 25 from 5-8pm for an opening reception of Ladies, Babies + Hades.

We would like to thank our sponsors Rare Form Brewing Company and No Name Design.

Howdy Doody, December - January 2015-16. Curated by Leona Christie

Discernible Regularities - June 2014

Discernible Regularities - June 2014

I Wrote You A Love Letter - work by Jordan Baker - February 2014

I Wrote You A Love Letter - work by Jordan Baker - February 2014

In a country without maps - January 2014

In a country without maps - January 2014

Collective 113 - December 2013

Collective 113 - December 2013

Oh, the Places... - November 2013

Chasing Tales: Helen J. Bullard & Julie Casper Roth - October 2013

+ one - August 2013

Cascadia , curated by Jenny Kemp - May 2013

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Place and Displace  - April 2013

Louisiana Sampler , curated by Ingrid Ludt - March 2013

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Working / Drawing (co-sponsored by Collar Works, at Fulton Street Gallery) - January 2013

Speed Curses (Performance written and directed by Josh Chambers) - January 2013

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The Veil - MFA Thesis Show by Julie Casper Roth  - November 2012

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Which Way - Work by Abe Ferraro  - December 2012

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New Works by John Umphlett  - October 2012

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Summer All Present, Curated by Kara Jefts and Jake Winiski - August 2012

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Percolate!, Curated by Jenny Kemp and Jake Winiski - July 2012

Gilding the Collapse: Artists of the Billboard Art Project, Curated by Jennifer Hunold - June 2012

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Patrick Mohundro, Curated by Benjamin H. Hillis - May 2012

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Transmissions, Work by Katherine Bennett - March and April 2012

Collar Works Art Works, Curated by Jake Winiski - December through March 2012

12 minus one - Curated by young artists of SUNY Albany and Adam Frelin - November 2011

Historical Past: Justin Baker and Kyra Garrigue, Curated by Colin Boyd - October 2011

Pursuant Pharaohs, Curated by Georgia Wohnsen and Jenny Kemp - September 2011

in-organic, Curated by Jennifer Hunold - August 2011
Handmade Nation screening - September 2011

Horizons Living Memory: Work by Jake Winiski, Curated by Jake Winiski and Colin Boyd - July 2011

Strongarmmin’ - Stanley Boyd Palmeri, Curated by Sanford Mirling - June 2011

Members Only, Curated by Sanford Mirling - May 2011

Country Culture Geography, Curated by Colin Boyd - April 2011

Failure, Curated by Yaminay Chaudhri. March 2011

Heat Up, Curated by Ellie Marcovitz and Colin Boyd - January 2011

Non Sequitur, Curated by the young artists of SUNY Albany and Sanford Mirling - November2010

The Gloaming, Curated by John Yost - October 2010

Mash Up! Curated by Sanford Mirling - September 2010

Deschannel  - October 2009